TEST: Functions

Welcome to the website test page. Below you’ll find a sampling of functions and features that can be built into your program webpages, most of which are designed to help organize content in a user-friend and/or attractive way. Spend a moment playing around with each of these below, then when it’s time to flesh out your program’s pages, you can work with Evan to add content using the most appropriate functions for your needs. A few caveats before you begin exploring:

  • This test page ain’t meant to be pretty… it’s just to show what’s possible.
  • All fonts, colors, etc. can be adjusted and will be consistent with our branding style
  • One goal with these webpage tools is to avoid a million different pages. Anytime we can use a function like those below instead of creating a new page, all the better. I’ve created a basic outline for main pages here. Please review and add only the most necessary pages.
  • Page vs. post: a page is a permanent pillar of sorts, like the “Food Safety” landing page for instance, something that will remain and is core to our programs. A “post” is something more specific or time-sensitive, like an event, a blog, a new food safety resource, etc. That new food safety resource, for instance, will be accessible from the Food Safety page, but doesn’t need its own page per se.
  • As we begin this process, let’s start with the basics, only the most important pages and functions of the website. We can always go back and add things as we go along. But for now, to avoid overwhelming you and us, let’s focus on the necessities.
  • Lastly, as we develop this webpage, please put yourself in the shoes of a busy farmer looking for resources. Regardless of how we talk about our programs internally or how a certain grant is written, pages should be designed and organized with the user in mind. Keep it simple, actionable and pragmatic.
  • I’ll be following up with all program leads in the coming weeks.

Enjoy!

PROGRAM NAME

We work with farms to reduce the ag sector’s carbon footprint by promoting a suite of on-farm practices—from cover crops to reduced tillage, hedgerows to crop/livestock integration—lowering emissions and sequestering carbon.

This is a very profound blurb. Inspired yet?

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TESTIMONIALS MAKE OUR WEBSITE MORE HUMAN

"In tristique commodo est, ut feugiat ex viverra ac. Suspendisse potenti. Phasellus tellus quam, interdum eget cursus sed, accumsan non leo. Cras facilisis ut neque nec fringilla. Fusce laoreet risus eu quam vehicula, ut lacinia ligula rutrum."
Paul Kaiser
Farmer & CAFF Climate Smart Farming Committee

This function is called "Accordion"

Hedgerows are strips of perennial (long-lasting) plants that grow along a field’s borders, fence lines or waterways. Hedgerows can incorporate a diversity of plant species—from trees to shrubs to ground covers—offering a wide variety of functions. They provide habitat for wildlife, many of which are beneficial predators of pests. Greater on-farm biodiversity can also help break down organic matter, maintain soils quality and recycle nutrients. Hedgerows provide a barrier to slow water flow and can protection against winds.

Many hedgerows are also planted to attract pollinators, essential for the fertility of many crops and the overall health of the ecosystem.

A cover crop is a plant that is used primarily to slow erosion, improve soil health, enhance water availability, smother weeds, help control pests and diseases, increase biodiversity and bring a host of other benefits to our farms.

Cover crops can also increase crop yields, break through a tough earth, add organic matter to the soil, improve crop diversity on farms and attract pollinators. Growing cover crops increases resilience in the face of erratic and increasingly intensive rainfall, as well as under drought conditions. Cover crops mitigate climate change from greenhouse-gas fluxes by increasing soil carbon sequestration and reducing fertilizer use after the use of legume-based cover crops.

Dry-farming is crop production that relies on residual soil moisture to meet growth requirements. With sufficient winter rainfall and healthy soils with organic matter, the water retained in the ground can support plant growth and fruit development during the dry season without supplemental irrigation. Crops such as grapes, tomatoes, potatoes, cucumbers, melons, grains, and some tree fruits are compatible with this technique. And with rainfall more erratic, dry farming can be an adaptive tool in the face of climate change.

Dry farming has a long history of use in Europe and California. Starting in the 1970s, drip irrigation in orchards and vineyards became common, and the practice of dry farming declined. However, throughout the state farmers are returning to this technique with renewed interest.

Crops and livestock have historically been integrated in farming systems. But while a trend towards monocrop specialization over the past century has made it rare, more and more farmers are rediscovering the benefits of integration. By combining livestock and crop production, the whole farm nutrient balance of imports and exports—fertility in, abundance out—evens out. Manure and compost applications improve soil organic matter, biological activity and potential disease suppression. Livestock provide a productive use for crop residue and waste and cull vegetable crops, and can enhance the benefits of cover crops. This can help reduce disease while providing a cost-effective source of feed for livestock by, for instance, turning animals onto a field post-harvest or grazing sheep through a winter cover crop.

No-till agriculture allows a farmer to plant crops and control weeds without turning the soil. While traditional plowing is effective for weed control and loosening compacted soil, it exposes the organic-matter-rich topsoil to the surface and breaks up the structure that naturally forms. Unbroken organic matter attracts and holds onto water, ensuring proper hydration for plant roots, even during dry periods. With the help of a healthy subterranean ecosystem teeming with micro-organisms undisturbed by tillage, the organic matter breaks down slowly, releasing vital nutrients, such as nitrogen, phosphorous and potassium—essential for plant growth. When soil is turned, the decomposition of organic matter is accelerated resulting in the loss of beneficial soil organic matter. This decomposition releases carbon dioxide to the atmosphere, thereby increasing greenhouse gas emissions from the farm. With the help of these new techniques and the application of compost, no-till agriculture is yet another tool to use against climate change.

 

Holistic Management is an approach to land stewardship that harmonizes the economic, social, and ecological goals of working lands. This process first prompts stakeholders to articulate their needs and values—from ecological health to social well-being to economic profit margins. This information is then used to craft a grazing plan that informs the movement and management of wild and domestic animals within a landscape across time.  Most holistically managed lands seek to synchronize grazing and animal impact in a way that allows for the full recovery of grasslands that sustain them. By planning grazing around the ecological system, producers typically find their feed costs lowered while their grasslands become more abundant and diverse, animals are happier and healthier, native plant populations recover, soil health improves, and water cycles are restored.

This one's called "toggle", which is similar to "accordion" except that options don't retract when another one is opened

Call me Ishmael. Some years ago — never mind how long precisely — having little or no money in my purse, and nothing particular to interest me on shore, I thought I would sail about a little and see the watery part of the world. It is a way I have of driving off the spleen, and regulating the circulation. Whenever I find myself growing grim about the mouth; whenever it is a damp, drizzly November in my soul; whenever I find myself involuntarily pausing before coffin warehouses, and bringing up the rear of every funeral I meet; and especially whenever my hypos get such an upper hand of me, that it requires a strong moral principle to prevent me from deliberately stepping into the street, and methodically knocking people’s hats off — then, I account it high time to get to sea as soon as I can. This is my substitute for pistol and ball. With a philosophical flourish Cato throws himself upon his sword; I quietly take to the ship. There is nothing surprising in this. If they but knew it, almost all men in their degree, some time or other, cherish very nearly the same feelings towards the ocean with me.

Mother died today. Or maybe yesterday, I don’t know. I had a telegram from the home: ‘Mother passed away. Funeral tomorrow. Yours sincerely.’ That doesn’t mean anything. It may have been yesterday.

In the late summer of that year we lived in a house in a village that looked across the river and the plain to the mountains. In the bed of the river there were pebbles and boulders, dry and white in the sun, and the water was clear and swiftly moving and blue in the channels. Troops went by the house and down the road and the dust they raised powdered the leaves of the trees. The trunks of the trees too were dusty and the leaves fell early that year and we saw the troops marching along the road and the dust rising and leaves, stirred by the breeze, falling and the soldiers marching and afterward the road bare and white except for the leaves.

It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us, we were all going direct to Heaven, we were all going direct the other way — in short, the period was so far like the present period, that some of its noisiest authorities insisted on its being received, for good or for evil, in the superlative degree of comparison only.

These are basic program blocks:

Pilot Projects

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WHAT’S NEW IN CLIMATE SMART FARMING:

The below “cards” are automatically pulled from blog posts. The selection can be customized per page: for instance, on the Policy page, we can set it so that only posts tagged as “policy” show up. Or only posts tagged as “Sacramento Valley”, etc, etc. As new posts are added (be it a blog, a new food safety resources or an event) they will auto-populate below:

EMBED VIDEOS INTO YOUR PAGE:

Or an interactive map:

HOW ABOUT ICONS?

(Very sleek, very simple)

FARM-TO-MARKET

We connect farms with businesses, providing growers with a suite of practical services—from food safety assistance to coordinating institutional purchasing—to ensure supply and demand grow together.

POLICY

We are the voice of sustainable agriculture in Sacramento. For 40 years, we've been advocating for state and national policies that create more resilient family farms, communities and ecosystems.

FARMERS GUILD

Our California-wide network of guilds provide local hubs where farmers and ag advocates gather to share resources, trade best practices, learn, and collectively advocate for family farms in their community.

CLIMATE SMART AG

We work with farms to reduce the ag sector’s carbon footprint by promoting a suite of on-farm practices—from cover crops to reduced tillage, hedgerows to crop/livestock integration—lowering emissions and sequestering carbon.

CHICKEN SURVEY

Some silly

Probably use these

But just in case...

These flip boxes are nifty

With some blurb text here below

Stuff on the other side

This could be cool for displaying multiple resources and avoids long lists of boring text.
Click Here

GOT WATERMELON?

HEY! WHO ATE THE MELON?

Click Here

I think the melon muncher is hiding behind this box...

DAVE, DON'T EAT ALL THE WATERMELON!

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AH, THERE'S PLENTY TO GO AROUND!

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Click Here

This is a Call to Action!

HELP WILDFIRE SURVIVORS!

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WOW, LOOK AT ALL THESE BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE!

(All these photos can be hyper-linked too)

COUNT DOWN TO THE APOCALYPSE ...

Unless we sequester 3 billion tons of carbon in the soil!

Days
Hours
Minutes
Seconds

Our services

Brand Strategy

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Graphic design

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Consultants

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Art direction

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Prototyping

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Web development

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THIS IS JUST AN IMAGE GALLERY:

ADD LINKS & BUTTONS LIKE SO:

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on print
Print
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on email
Email
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn
0
HOW MANY SLICES OF WATERMELON CAN DAVE EAT?
HOW MUCH OF THAT WATERMELON HAS DAVE EATEN SO FAR?
Percentage of watermelon consumed 75%

"TABS" work great to display lots of content in an easily sortable way without making visitors click around to multiple pages, like so:

2019 CA Legislative Bills of Concern to CAFF

KEY
Clicking on the bill will take you to the full text, clicking on the subject will take you to a fact sheet, and clicking on our position will take you to any support or oppose letter.
transparent-green-checkmark-md = Passed
2000px-Xmark01.svg = Expired
2 YR = bill held until next year or later
MM.DD.YY = next hearing
COMM = “Committee”

BillSubjectCAFF PositionHouse of Origin

COMM

House of Origin

FLOOR

Second House

COMM

Second House

FLOOR

Governor
AB 202

(Mathis)

Safe Harbor AgreementsSupport     
AB 409

(Limón)

Climate AdaptationSupport     
AB 488

(Aguiar- Curry)

Rural Prosperity ActSupport     
AB 838

(Eggman)

Small Farm Program 2.0Support     
AB 958

(Aguiar- Curry)

Organic-to-SchoolSupport     
AB 986(Rivas)Land Equity ProgramSupport     
AB 1086

(Bauer-Kahan)

SWEEPSupport     
SB 62

(Dodd)

Safe Harbor AgreementsSupport     
SB 499

(McGuire)

School Food SubsidiesSupport     
        

Updated 04-04-19

BillSubjectCAFF PositionHouse of Origin

COMM

House of Origin

FLOOR

Second House

COMM

Second House

FLOOR

Governor
 AB 18 (Garcia)Park BondSupport if Amendedtransparent-green-checkmark-mdtransparent-green-checkmark-md2000px-Xmark01.svg  
AB 243
(Cooper)
Beef CommissionOppose2 YR  
 AB 277 (Mathis)Rural Water SystemsSupport 
 AB 321 (Mathis)SGMA and farmers Support transparent-green-checkmark-md transparent-green-checkmark-md  
 AB 441 (Frazier)Zoning farm cafes Support2 YR    
 AB 465 (Ting)Urban Ag Supporttransparent-green-checkmark-mdtransparent-green-checkmark-md
AB 472 (Frazier) Water transfersSupport transparent-green-checkmark-mdtransparent-green-checkmark-md2000px-Xmark01.svg  
AB 768 (Aguiar-Curry) Certified Farmers Markets Support
transparent-green-checkmark-md
transparent-green-checkmark-md 
AB 822 (Cabllero)Buy CA produce Support transparent-green-checkmark-md transparent-green-checkmark-md
AB 1036 (McCarty) Organic waste recyclingSupporttransparent-green-checkmark-mdtransparent-green-checkmark-md 2 YR  
 AB 1219 (Eggman)Food donationSupporttransparent-green-checkmark-md transparent-green-checkmark-md  transparent-green-checkmark-md
AB 1342 (Flora) GGRF for CalRecycleSupport 2000px-Xmark01.svg    
AB 1348 (Aguiar-Curry)Disadvantaged farmersSupporttransparent-green-checkmark-mdtransparent-green-checkmark-mdtransparent-green-checkmark-md
 AB 1420 (Aguiar-Curry)Ponds for irrigationSupport transparent-green-checkmark-mdtransparent-green-checkmark-md 2000px-Xmark01.svg  
AB1433 (Wood)Climate & Natural LandsSupport transparent-green-checkmark-mdtransparent-green-checkmark-md 2000px-Xmark01.svg 
 AB 1503 (Aguiar-Curry)ApprenticeshipsSupport2 YR    
 SB 5
(De Leon)
Parks BondSupporttransparent-green-checkmark-mdtransparent-green-checkmark-md 
SB 252 (Dodd) Well permitsSupport transparent-green-checkmark-mdtransparent-green-checkmark-md 
 transparent-green-checkmark-md
SB 240 (Dodd)Napa FW Housing Supporttransparent-green-checkmark-mdtransparent-green-checkmark-md   
SB 435 (Dodd)Williamson Act SubventionsSupport2000px-Xmark01.svg    
SB 732 (Stern)Ag Land PlansSupport if amended transparent-green-checkmark-mdtransparent-green-checkmark-md 
SB 782 (Skinner)School Food GrantSupport  transparent-green-checkmark-mdtransparent-green-checkmark-md2000px-Xmark01.svg  
SB 623 (Monning)Drinking Water transparent-green-checkmark-mdtransparent-green-checkmark-md2 YR  

Last Update: Oct 16, 2017

EMBED A FACEBOOK PAGE RIGHT INTO THE WEBSITE:

STAFF BIO FOR A PROGRAM PAGE:

Sara Tiffany
Climate Smart Farming Program Specialist

Sara oversees CAFF’s Climate Smart Farming program, which works with farmers, researchers and other agencies to investigate and promote climate smart practices throughout California. For years, Sara has worked to promote sustainable agriculture both in the classroom and in the field, and has a passion for connecting the two. She has graduate degrees from University of California, Davis, in Soils and Biochemistry and International Agricultural Development, and has a background in international development work. 

sara[at]caff.org    |    530.756.8518 x128

GOT LOTS OF CONTENT?

MAYBE YOU NEED A SEARCH BAR FOR YOUR WEBPAGE?